Friday, 14 July 2017

The Sixth Mass Extinction - And We Just Sit By and Watch it Happen



In a week in which scientists warned that other species are facing “biological annihilation”, Population Matters is urging organisations which educate the public about natural history to stop pulling their punches and tell people what’s really going on. Earlier today, we launched our new ‘Welcome to the Anthropocene’ campaign outside London’s world-famous Natural History Museum, with the help of Big Foot, a spectacular and provocative “exhibit”.

Big Foot
Life-size Big Foot is made of hundreds of steel mesh “babies” and is standing on, or rather in, a squashed planet Earth with the remains of living things on his over-sized foot. A strong message which we think is needed to help people wake up to the danger the living world faces and the urgent need to do something about it.

Last month, our director Robin and PM patrons Chris Packham and Professor Aubrey Manning wrote to the Natural History Museum’s director, Sir Michael Dixon, asking him to ensure that the museum provides its millions of visitors with vital information about the state of our planet. In their letter they asked him to ensure the museum “takes the lead in presenting the facts about the impacts of our species upon the Earth, its biodiversity and ecosystems”, saying it is entirely in line with the museum’s stated mission:

“to challenge the way people think about the natural world – its past, present and future. We aim to stimulate public debate about humanity’s future and equip our audiences at every level with an understanding of science.”

Welcome to the Anthropocene
The impact of human beings been on the Earth in the last 200 years has been so deep that scientists are now calling for our period in the planet’s history to be called the ‘Anthropocene’ – the age of humans. Tragically, our impact has almost always been for the worse. Species of animals and plants are disappearing so fast that scientists and conservationists call it the ‘sixth mass extinction’.

The fine balance of chemicals in our air and seas has been disrupted with dangerous consequences – our carbon emissions are driving global warming and ocean acidification, while excesses of nitrogen and phosphorous from industry and agriculture are turning parts of the sea into dead zones.

Our enormous population growth – we are now adding a billion people every 12 to 15 years – and consumption are driving these changes. Population growth is not inevitable and we can end and reverse it, to the benefit of everyone, and everything, on our planet.






Wednesday, 12 July 2017

Beyond Organic Skincare - Press release 2017

PRESS RELEASE JULY 2017

Our NEW Organic Shine & Strength Shampoo and Conditioner, Moisturising Body Wash and Antibacterial Hand Wash are free from all sulphates - instead containing gentle surfactants made from coconut, in quantities that cleanse without drying or irritating.

Gentle, mild & effective, these soothing concoctions are perfect for sensitive skin and those with skin conditions such as psoriasis or eczema. Each product contains a range of ingredients, including organic aloe vera and glycerin, to soothe and moisturise.

Fresh, unisex scents derived from pure organic essential oils revitalise the senses.

Suitable for home use and for the hospitality market.

“This is Exactly what I have been looking for in a natural shampoo! I only use organic products, except shampoo and conditioner as no natural one has ever felt nice…Until now! My extra-long hair loves it and so do I! Thank you.” Jade Gillow-Hurd.

“Love this conditioner and got great results with much less than I usually have to apply. Hair was soft, shiny and felt light. Brilliant product.” Debbie Young.

People with dry, damaged or coloured hair, dry skin and conditions such as eczema, should find a marked improvement by going sulphate free:

 “I have used sulphate-free shampoo, body soap, and baby wash exclusively and I have definitely noticed less flare-ups of eczema and dry scalp/dry skin, my hair is less frizzy, and my body feels softer — my hair even seems to respond better to my hair products after each shampoo!” Tamara Floyd.

For more details, visit:   https://beyondorganicskincare.com

Tel: 01326 574000      

e: info@beyondskincare.co.uk



Wednesday, 21 June 2017

Is it possible to produce goods and services in a fair and ethical way, without damaging the environment?

There remains fierce debate surrounding the question of whether consumerism can ever be accommodated within a sustainable framework. In other words, is it possible to produce goods and services in a fair and ethical way, without damaging the environment? The question is not quite so straightforward. For example some fair trade products such as coffee can be ethically produced, but can also have an adverse impact on the environment. It would appear, therefore, that there is no universally accepted definition of what actually constitutes green consumerism.

This lack of consensus does not mean, however, that we cannot live greener and more sustainable lifestyles – far from it. There is a growing realisation today that our actions are having a detrimental effect on the planet, pushing more people to consider how they can make a difference. The increase in demand for fair trade products and surge in clean energy are two areas that are testament to this. Other people see sustainable living as an effective way of reducing costs and saving money. For example, insulating the house or car sharing.

Having decided to adopt a greener lifestyle, reduce our carbon footprint and save money into the bargain, the question then arises of how we go about finding green products and services amongst the myriad of confusing claims, greenwashing and different alternatives! There are suppliers of everything from fair trade clothing to green insurance policies, but these have tended to be fairly disparate and involved lots of internet searches and shopping around niche websites.

A genuine desire to help protect the planet, encourage sustainable living and make it easier for eco-conscious shoppers to find greener products and services led to my decision in 2005 to launch the Green Providers Directory.

The idea was that the directory would provide a one-stop shop for all things green, eco-friendly and sustainable – all under one roof. Suppliers are listed in easy-to-use sections, with a description of what they provide and contact details. The directory is free and easy to use, providing links to a range of renewable energy suppliers, fair trade clothing, health and beauty products, energy saving devices, ethical gifts and organic wines, as well as news and updates on environmental issues and related topics.

The directory has since been listed in The Guardian and Channel 4’s environmental sections and on green.tv, a United Nations Environmental Programme. It also has a number of links with schools and universities, including Cambridge University, Bradford University and the University of Huddersfield, providing articles and information on green issues and sustainable living.

The directory is also involved in areas such as helping to protect the world’s rainforests and endangered species, writing articles for green blogs and publications, and providing support for a number of environmental causes and campaigns.

In the 11 years since the launch of the Green Providers Directory we have seen progress in many areas such as growth in clean energy production, fair trade products being stocked in major supermarkets, electric cars, charges for plastic bags, climate change agreements and banning of bee-harming pesticides. But we’ve also witnessed fracking, continued population growth, species extinction, rainforests being destroyed for palm oil plantations and other severe ecological threats.

I would like to think that the directory has made a useful contribution to protecting the environment, and that it can play an ongoing role in helping to build a sustainable future for our children and the planet’s rich and diverse wildlife.

Guest post by Dr Gary Robertshaw

Coca-Cola - Myth busting Coke's claims on ocean plastics | Greenpeace UK

As thousands of Greenpeace supporters have piled the pressure on Coca-Cola, the mega brand is starting to take notice - but Coke’s answers aren’t yet good enough.

When we launched our report showing how Coke is failing to take responsibility for the damage its plastic bottles are causing in the ocean, the company said it was “disappointed” by our findings. What’s really disappointing is that in the past decade, Coca-Cola has actually increased the proportion of single-use plastic bottles across its global packaging mix. But when we delivered a 2.5 ton monument to ocean plastic pollution to Coca-Cola’s London HQ, a spokesperson simply stuck to the line that they were “disappointed”.

Since April, over 88,000 of you have written to Coke’s CEO in Europe, calling on the world’s largest soft drinks company to ditch throwaway plastic to protect our oceans from plastic pollution. Hundreds of you called Coca-Cola’s switchboard in a single afternoon, and have been sharing spoof videos and gifs on social media showing the devastating impact Coke’s single-use plastic bottles are having on marine wildlife.

Read more: Coca-Cola - Myth busting Coke's claims on ocean plastics | Greenpeace UK



Friday, 2 June 2017

Best Years



Best Years stock a wide range of handmade, fairtrade and organic toys from around the world. Includes the fabulous Pebble crochet toys, hats and blankets, the only crochet toys with WFTO status. Also Under the Nile organic and fairtrade toys and swaddle blankets. Handmade in Egypt from organic Egyptian cotton and perfect for babies. Friendly service guaranteed. www.bestyears.co.uk



Thursday, 16 March 2017

Original Volunteers

Original Volunteers
Original Volunteers have been providing affordable volunteer opportunities worldwide since 2006. Projects last 1 to 24 weeks and run throughout the year on flexible start dates. All ages and levels welcome. Local support teams at all locations providing airport transfers and assistance throughout the placement. Tailored placements also available. 1 – 2 projects each year can provide free accommodation. www.originalvolunteers.co.uk
Not sure if you need a number and email for enquiries too?….
Email: contact [at] originalvolunteers.co.uk
Tel: 01603 280702



Friday, 3 February 2017

Freeflush Rainwater Harvesting


Freeflush Rainwater Harvesting FreeFlush design and supply rainwater harvesting systems. FreeFlush design experience has been nurtured through many years working in the water industry.

The designs range from simple wall hung water butts through to large underground tanks with pumped control. They aim to make rainwater harvesting more accessible through their innovative products. 

Visit www.freeflush.co.uk